MATCHING SUITS & LOUIS VUITTON PUMPS

Wednesday, May 28, 2014




Please excuse the unsightly band-aid on my right ankle, bruised last Friday when I was running between events- from the Happy Socks launch at Waterloo to KOMONO launch at Surry Hills. I considered photoshopping the band-aid out, but then went against it. 

I thought it'd be a good way to showcase the truth about being a fashion blogger- no, we do not always have the perfect body, perfect make up and perfectly unbruised ankles for goodness sake. We are just like anyone else. Our feet hurt just as much from too much high-heeling and guess what, towards the end of the day, I took my heels off and changed into my Nike Free Runs* to visit a PR showroom because #YOHAAO (YouOnlyHaveAnAnkleOnce), and I suddenly realised I don't have to be mindful of every step anymore! Wished I'd photographed that too! 


*A bit of context in case you think I have a Mary Poppins bag that whips out Nikes front left center: I was going to the gym that day before heading home, so I just happened to have my runners with me! Yay :-)



I'm wearing: My Boutique top, jacket, pants and necklace, Miu Miu sunnies, Louis Vuitton 'Oh Really' pumps

I have an obsession with matching suits for what seems like, forever, but weirdly enough, I've never actually owned one until now. I wore this exact ensemble to work the day after it came in the mail, and a work colleague commented that she wouldn't have chosen the pieces separately, but put together, they look amazing! I'd like to agree with her on this!

What drew me to this outfit was the print. If you follow my blog you'd know I'm not a huge fan of prints, but when I occasionally come across one, it's MAD LOVE. The designer behind this incredible collection is Danielle Faulkner, founder of My Boutique. As a successful fashion business owner (I'm 22 now, and when she was my age she's already started her on online store!), she's someone I look up to and I'm lucky enough to have a chat with her. Read on to find out more about her unconventional path into the fashion industry, and how she remained relevant and competitive in this dog-eat-dog world.


1. Tell us a little about yourself. 

I’m 25, I love fashion, travel, food and a bargain! If I’m not doing something My Boutique related I’m gossiping with my girlfriends or watching a ridiculous movie and laughing with my boyfriend.


2. How did you initially get into designing? 

It all started on a trip to Bali about 6 years ago. I was always interested in fashion but never thought I would ever get into the fashion industry. After getting a dress made in Bali for the races, I fell in love with it and with the people that made it. Every trip for the next couple of years I’d get things made – dresses, pants, tops & shoes (basically everything). All of my friends were loving all my new pieces that I’d designed so I opened my online store. And 3 and a half years later, here I am. I never had any training in design, it’s all self-taught with a lot of trial and error.


3. What advice do you have for fashion design students or someone trying to start their own label? 

Never give up. It’s always going to be difficult, time consuming and exhausting but it’s all worth it once you get there.


4. What's the inspiration behind your latest collection? 

Hopeless Romantic is all about me being a romantic at heart. As lame as that may sound it’s true haha. Looking at the catwalk shows from Myer, David Jones and both Melbourne & Sydney Fashion Weeks, these prints in Hopeless Romantic & colours are bang on trend.


5. What's your plan for My Boutique in the next 5 years? 

To have my clothing in more stores across Australia, I’d love one in every state. We currently have one in my home town Geelong (since November) and it’s been a massive hit here!


6. What's the best and worst thing about designing and having your own fashion business? 

Best – being your own boss. Being able to do what you want with your designs and not having someone make decisions & dictate everything for you.

Worst – the amount of time you have to put into everything. Starting out was hard putting a lot of time and energy to get everything going. Things haven’t slowed down much at all, with social media, emails, orders and everything else that comes with it – it’s a full time job in itself (even though I also have a day job!).


7. Have you ever faced criticisms about your designs? If so, how do you deal with it? 


To be honest I haven’t! Which is great! Most people would think that you would have a lot of returns for ill-fitting items or change of mind however I’ve probably only had about 10 of those in my 3 and a half years since starting My Boutique. I’m sure I have some people that don’t like my designs or fabrics however I’d never take anything to heart if they did, it’s all a part of the learning process of having your own business.






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4 thoughts

  1. Love the matchy matchy pant suit... and of course those Miu Miu sunnies! xxx

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  2. Hope your ankle will feel better again soon :)
    I love everything about this suit, the print, the cut the color - it's just fabulous!
    xx


    www.bohemianjourneys.blogspot.com

    ReplyDelete
  3. I love the print on your suit too! It looks fantastic when the pieces are worn together :)


    Away From The Blue

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